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Where will your Geomatics Career Bring You?

GPS work in Labrador“Should you Specialize or Diversify?”

Something many of us in geomatics often come across in our careers is whether or not we should be specialized on a specific geomatics aspect (like a certain software or skill set) or should we diversify and become competent in a multitude of geomatics related disciplines.

One particular problem with being really specialized in something is that although you become an expert in something you can often be too focused, and potentially closing other doors or limiting possible career paths. When you diversify you can still become specialized in things but at a lesser extent yet work with more components of the industry.

When I started off my geomatics career I thought it was better to become specialized in a particular trait and that would maintain my career path. Well that did work out pretty good for a few years, and I became very efficient in one aspect of geomatics (orthophotography and imagery analysis).

However one day I realized that I was focused only a narrow spectrum of the skills that I had worked so hard to learn. As a result I was losing many other skill-sets that I had developed.

“My career and has allowed me to be involved in many projects that go well beyond what my education prepared me for.”

Since then I have almost gone to the other extreme and have become diversified, experienced and well rounded with a multitude of geomatics skills which has in turn often provided me an edge in my career and has allowed me to be involved in many projects that go well beyond what my COGS education prepared me for. And I find that it makes for a more interesting career when your job allows you to combine a multitude of different geomatics aspects together.

GPS work Mealy MountainsNow, everyone is different and the great thing about the Canadian geomatics industry is that there are plenty of opportunities to Specialize or Diversify, so perhaps you should consider ‘Where will your Geomatics Career Bring You?’ when you are sending out your resumes. Do go out there, network and get advice from others, But do what best suits your career aspirations.

I have been fortunate enough to be able to travel all over North and Central America with my jobs over the years and recently I came back from doing some field work in Newfoundland & Labrador and since last month’s GoGeomatics theme was “Canadian Surveying & Surveyors” Jonathan asked if I could share some of my photos from the trip with the GoGeomatics Magazine.

The five week trip involved GPS and total station survey work in many remote scenic locations with pretty decent weather (only a few days of snow). I have included a few photos here, but you can find more on my Flickr photo account or on my blog where I frequently add photos and information about my trips and projects that I have been involved with.


Note: This post was picked up by GoGeomatics and also published in their digital magazine

3D Perspective View Samples

Port Lorne, Nova Scotia

[*image source: PaulIllsley.com]

The following images are examples of perspective view models that were generated from a 2 meter LIDAR DEM integrated with 50 cm digital orthophotography of Port Lorne, Nova Scotia. Port Lorne is a coastal community along the Bay of Fundy with a relatively steep terrain so the images represent different perspective views depending on the source of origin and the direction that they are facing.

3D Perspective Views of Port Lorne, Nova Scotia

The colored arrows on the key image to the right represent the different perspective views that were generated from different locations and viewed along different directions (displayed in the images below). This image of the area also represents the traditional GIS view from above, as discussed above.

The first image below represents a perspective view (red arrow) of the area if it were viewed from the center of the image, above the wharf looking in an easterly direction.

3-D perspective view model of Port Lorne; Nova Scotia

The next two images below represents a perspective view (blue arrow) of the area if it were viewed from the upper right hand corner of the original image in a south west direction. The images that demonstrate the same perspective but have different types of LIDAR DEMs integrated with them allowing them to portray different data within them.

3-D perspective view model of Port Lorne; Nova Scotia3-D perspective view model of Port Lorne; Nova Scotia

 

The next two images (first one represented with the green arrow, second one in blue) represents a perspective view of the area originated in the upper left hand corner of the image, but in slightly different directions.

3D Perspective Views of Port Lorne, Nova Scotia

3D Perspective Views of Port Lorne, Nova Scotia

More info on 3D Perspective Views